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Winsor & Newton Winton Oil Color - Vermilion Hue, 37 ml tube

Item #:00430-3423
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Winsor & Newton Winton Oil Color - Vermilion Hue, 37 ml tube
Winsor & Newton Winton Oil Color - Vermilion Hue, 37 ml tube

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AP Non-Toxic.

Products bearing the AP seal of the Art & Creative Materials Institute, Inc. (ACMI) are certified non-toxic. A product can be certified non-toxic only if it contains no materials in sufficient quantities to be toxic or injurious to humans, or to cause acute or chronic health problems.

Product Details

Color:
Vermilion Hue
Mfg #:
1414682
No.
682
Size:
37 ml

Pigment Information

This color contains the following pigments:

PR170-Naphthol Red

PO36-Benzimidazolone Orange

PW4-Zinc White


Pigment Name

PR170-Naphthol Red

Pigment Type

organic, naphthol AS

Chemical Formula

C26H22N4O4

Properties

Pigment PR170 is a bright deep red with bluish undertones. It has an average drying time. It has two crystaline forms that differ significantly in opacity. The more transparent form (F5RK) tends to be more bluish and is less lightfast.

Permanence

The lightfastness and weatherfastness of Pigment PR170 varies, depending on the application and the crystaline form. The opaque form (F3RK) has very good lightfastness, and is more weather resistant. The transparent form (F5RK) has lightfastness that is considered acceptable in pure applications, but it fades more in tints. Neither form is considered suitable for exterior use.

Toxicity

Naphthol Reds are not considered toxic. They may cause eye, skin, or respiratory irritation. Contact with dry pigment should be avoided.

History

Naphthol pigments are actually dyes that are "laked" to form pigments. First developed by the German chemical company Hoechst A.G. before World War I, their use in artist paints began in the 1920s. Pigment Red PR170 is a Naphthol AS pigment, chemically related to the diarylide yellow pigments. The Naphthol AS pigments comprise a range of reds. They are used in plastics, textiles, and printing inks.


Pigment Name

PO36-Benzimidazolone Orange

Pigment Type

organic, monoazo

Chemical Formula

C17H13ClN6O5

Properties

Benzimidazolone Orange is a reddish orange pigment that can lose its intensity and become dull in tints. It has an average drying time.

Permanence

Benzimidazolone Orange has excellent lightfastness and outstanding heat and solvent stability for a monoazo pigment.

Toxicity

Benzimidazolone Orange is not considered toxic.

History

The benzimidazolone group of pigments was developed and patented in 1960 by Hoechst A.G., a German chemical manufacturer that was a forerunner of the pharmaceutical company Aventis. Use of benzimidazolone pigments in the auto industry, especially Benzimidazolone Orange, became common in the 1980s because they were common replacements for lead chromate pigments, which were phased out during this period.


Pigment Name

PW4-Zinc White

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

zinc(II)-oxide

Chemical Formula

ZnO

Properties

Zinc White is the coolest white, and it has a cold, clean masstone and a slightly bluish tint. It has less hiding power and is more transparent than other whites. It dries slowly and is good for painting wet into wet and for glazing and scumbling. Zinc White is neither as opaque nor as heavy as Lead White, its covering power is not as good, and it takes much longer to dry. However, it does not blacken when exposed to sulfur in the air as Lead White does. It is very valuable for making tints with other colors. Unmixed Zinc White dries to a brittle and dry paint film that may crack over the years, so it is not good for frescoing. It is more transparent in acrylic form than Titanium White and is the most commonly used white with gouache. Chinese White is a version of Zinc White appropriate for opaque watercolor techniques.

Permanence

Zinc White has great permanence and lightfastness.

Toxicity

Zinc White is moderately toxic if ingested and slightly toxic if inhaled.

History

Though historians are divided on who first isolated the element zinc, they agree that it was first suggested as a white pigment in 1782. Zinc White was accepted as a watercolor in 1834 and was called Chinese White due to the popularity of oriental porcelain in Europe at the time. Ten years later, a suitable oil form was produced. By the early 20th century, it had improved to the point where it was an acceptable alternative to Flake White.


Safety Data Sheet

UPC Code: 094376711677

ASIN #: B004O7DOG2