Rembrandt Artists' Oil Color - Burnt Carmine, 40 ml tube

Item #:00417-8643
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Rembrandt Artists' Oil Color - Burnt Carmine, 40 ml tube and swatch

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AP Non-Toxic

Products bearing the AP seal of the Art & Creative Materials Institute, Inc. (ACMI) are certified non-toxic. A product can be certified non-toxic only if it contains no materials in sufficient quantities to be toxic or injurious to humans, or to cause acute or chronic health problems.

Product Details

Description:
Artists' Oil Color
Color:
Burnt Carmine
Size:
40 ml (1.35 oz)
Format:
Tube
No.
323
Series:
3
Mfg #:
01053232

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Pigment Information

This color contains the following pigments:

PR264-Pyrrole Rubine

PB29-Ultramarine [Blue]


Pigment Name

PR264-Pyrrole Rubine

Pigment Type

organic, aminoanthroquinone

Chemical Name

1,4-diketo-3,6-di(4'-tertiary butyl phenyl)-2,5-dihydro pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole

Chemical Formula

Properties

This bluish red transparent pigment has high tinting strength. Diketo pyrrolo pyrrole pigments are noteworthy for their light stability, excellent weatherability, and outstanding heat stability.

Permanence

Pyrrole Rubine has excellent permanence and lightfastness for an organic pigment in its color range.

Toxicity

Pyrrole pigments are considered to be non-toxic.

History

The Pyrrole group of synthetic organic pigments was developed in the 1980s. Pyrrole Rubine was first manufactured by Ciba Specialty Chemicals under the trade name Irgazine Ruby. Although not a perfect match for alizarin crimson, Pyrrole Rubine is one of several new pigments that has helped to close a traditional gap in the gamut of artist pigments, the lack of lightfast and transparent colors in the red/blue and red/violet parts of the spectrum.


Pigment Name

PB29-Ultramarine [Blue]

Pigment Type

inorganic

Chemical Name

complex silicate of sodium and aluminum with sulfur

Chemical Formula

Na8-10Al6Si6O24S2-4 or Na6-8Al6Si6O24S2-4

Properties

Ultramarine is the standard warm blue, a brilliant blue pigment that has the most purple and least green in its undertone. It has a moderate to high tinting strength and a beautiful transparency. Synthetic Ultramarine is not as vivid a blue as natural Ultramarine. Ultramarine dries slowly in oil and tends to produce clean, though granular, washes in watercolor. French Ultramarine mixes well with Alizarin colors in oil and watercolor form to create a range of purples and violets. It can dull when mixed with white in acrylic form, but mixes well with other colors. The shade varies based on manufacturer. Considered a great color for glazes, it is not suitable for frescoing.

Permanence

Ultramarine has excellent permanence, although synthetic Ultramarine is not as permanent as natural Ultramarine. It may discolor if exposed to acid because of its sulfuric content.

Toxicity

Ultramarine has no significant hazards.

History

The name for this pigment comes from the Middle Latin ultra, meaning beyond, and mare, meaning sea, because it was imported from Asia to Europe by sea. It is a prominent component of lapis lazuli and was used on Asian temples starting in the 6th century. It was one of the most expensive pigments in 16th century Europe, worth twice its weight in gold, and so was used sparingly and when commissions were larger. Ultramarine is currently imitated by a process invented in France in 1826 by Jean Baptiste Guimet, making blue affordable to artists and extending the range of colors on their palettes.


Safety Data Sheet

UPC Code: 8712079058821

ASIN #: B003E3PP8M